Practice News

Breathwork
26th May

Breath Work and Yoga Workshops

Drop in breath work and yoga Wednesdays 3:15-4pm and 4pm-5pm

 

Humankind Studio - 35A St George's Road Kemptown BN2 1ED

 

Please email sxicb-bh.ecb-pcn-team@nhs.net or text 07361476900 if you are interested

survivors drop in
26th May

LGBTQ+ Domestic Abuse Support Group

LGBTQ+ domestic abuse support group weekly drop in on Wednesday 5-7pm

 

Arcobaleno, Kemptown BN2 1EA

 

Contact outreach@acrossrainbows.com to find out more 

 

 

exercises
23rd May

Free Exercise Sessions

East & Central Brighton NHS PCN are holding free exercise sessions

Tai Chi Tuesdays 2-3pm Drop in - Suitable for alll

Circuits (beginner’s level Circuit Training Class that focuses on cardiovascular fitness and resistance training) Tuesday 3-4 pm

WHERE: ST MARTIN'S CHURCH HALL (WAGNER HALL, 37 LEWES ROAD, BN2 3HQ)

PLEASE CONTACT 07460 032613 TO JOIN

Yoga
11th May

Yoga Sessions

Drop in Yoga Sessions on Fridays 2pm-3pm 

Unit 4, 20-26 Round Hill Street, BN2 3RG

For enquiries:

Text only: 07361 476 900 

Email: sxicb-bh.ecb-pcn-team@nhs.net

23rd Mar

Practice Closures

The practice will be closed on the following dates :

Afternoon of Thursday 20th, from 12.30 pm to 6pm

Monday 1st May 

Monday 8th May 

Monday 29th May 

If you require urgent medical advice on these days please telephone 111.

Out-of-hours services are generally busy so please think carefully before asking to see a doctor and only do so if you genuinely cannot wait until the surgery re-opens.

In a genuine emergency you should call 999. Chest pains and/or shortness of breath constitute an emergency.  

If you need to see a GP there is also a walk-in clinic in the city. The Brighton Station Health Centre, Aspect House, 84-87  Queens Road, Brighton BN1 3XE that is open from 8am to 8pm every day. You do not need an appointment and can just walk in; patients will be seen on a first come, first served basis.  If you are unsure what medical help you need or need to see an out-of-hours GP or dentist, call 111.

17th Jan

B&H COVID-19 Information

The NHS should contact you if you're eligible for a seasonal booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine this spring.

You may be offered a seasonal booster if you:

  • are aged 75 or over (you need to have turned 75 on or before 30 June 2023)
  • live in a care home for older adults
  • are aged 5 or over and have a weakened immune system

To book: call 119 or go to www.nhs.uk/covid-booster

Help to get a COVID-19 vaccine

Talk to one of the vaccine team about any concerns you have including: which vaccine you need, where to go, how to book, help with transport or any worries you have about needles, getting an injection, leaving the house or side effects. Please call 0300 303 8060 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm) or email here.rovingpatients@nhs.net 

For further information visit: Covid-19 vaccinations - Sussex Health and Care (ics.nhs.uk).

For information in multiple languages, look at the SIS Covid webpage

 

6th Dec 2022

Scarlet fever/Strep A – advice for parents and carers

Scarlet fever, or ‘Strep A’, is caused by bacteria called group A streptococci (strep).

Scarlet fever is usually a mild illness, but it is highly infectious. Therefore, look out for symptoms in your child, which include a sore throat, headache, and fever, along with a fine, pinkish or red body rash with a sandpapery feel.

On darker skin, the rash can be more difficult to detect visually, but will have a sandpapery feel.

Contact NHS 111 or your GP practice if you suspect your child has scarlet fever, because early treatment of scarlet fever with antibiotics is important to reduce the risk of complications such as pneumonia.

If your child has scarlet fever, keep them at home until at least 24 hours after the start of antibiotic treatment to avoid spreading the infection to others.

In very rare occasions, the bacteria can get into the bloodstream and cause an illness called invasive Group A strep (iGAS). While still uncommon, there has been an increase in invasive Group A strep cases this year, particularly in children under 10, and sadly a small number of deaths which are being investigated.

It is important to mention that there are lots of viruses that cause sore throats, colds and coughs this time of year. In most cases, these infections will be a mild illness and can be treated at home. These should resolve without medical intervention. If you do need advice, your community pharmacy is a great first port of call for minor health issues. However, children can on occasion develop a bacterial infection on top of a virus and that can make them more unwell.

As a parent, if you feel that your child seems seriously unwell, you should trust your own judgement.

Contact NHS 111 or your GP practice if:

  • your child is getting worse
  • your child is feeding or eating much less than normal
  • your child has had a dry nappy for 12 hours or more or shows other signs of dehydration
  • your baby is under 3 months and has a temperature of 38°C, or is older than 3 months and has a temperature of 39°C or higher
  • your baby feels hotter than usual when you touch their back or chest, or feels sweaty
  • your child is very tired or irritable.

Call 999 if:

  • your child is having difficulty breathing – you may notice grunting noises or their tummy sucking under their ribs
  • there are pauses when your child breathes
  • your child’s skin, tongue or lips are blue
  • your child is floppy and will not wake up or stay awake.

Good hand and respiratory hygiene are important for stopping the spread of many bugs. By teaching your child how to wash their hands properly with soap for 20 seconds, using a tissue to catch coughs and sneezes, and keeping away from others when feeling unwell, they will be able to reduce the risk of picking up or spreading infections.

What you need to know – advice for parents and carers this winter

This is the first winter without pandemic restrictions in two years, and you and your children may be more susceptible to the usual winter bugs and viruses this year. 

Winter bugs and viruses are usually mild, but can sometimes become more serious, particularly in younger children or if an infection spreads to a vulnerable family member.

There are several common infections that your child might pick up over the winter period. In most cases, these infections will be a mild illness and can be treated at home. However, in some cases they might get worse and require medical help.

Some common infections include:

Flu

Flu can be an unpleasant illness in children causing a fever, stuffy nose, dry cough, sore throat, aching muscles and joints, and extreme tiredness. This can last several days or longer.

In most cases, flu will be a mild illness in children.

Some children can get a very high fever, sometimes without the usual flu symptoms, and may need to go to hospital for treatment. Serious complications of flu include a painful ear infection, acute bronchitis, and pneumonia.

The best way for your child to avoid flu, to ensure your child is vaccinated against flu. Learn more about the flu symptoms to look out for and who to contact, as well as vaccination.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

RSV is a common winter virus which affects children under the age of two.

Most cases are not serious and cause mild coughs and colds.

It is also the most common cause of bronchiolitis infants. Bronchiolitis can make breathing harder and cause difficulty feeding.

RSV can be more severe in premature babies, babies under 2 months and infants with underlying health conditions that increase their risk of acute lower respiratory tract infection. Breathing in cigarette smoke also increases the risk of a child getting bronchiolitis, so it is important not to smoke around your child.

Learn more about the bronchiolitis symptoms to look out for and who to contact if you have concerns. 

Scarlet Fever

Scarlet fever is usually a mild illness, but it is highly infectious and levels are higher than normal this year. Therefore, look out for symptoms in your child, which include a sore throat, headache, and fever, along with a characteristic fine, pinkish or red body rash with a sandpapery feel.

Contact your GP practice or NHS 111 if you suspect your child has scarlet fever, because early treatment of scarlet fever with antibiotics is important to reduce the risk of complications such as pneumonia.

If your child has Scarlet Fever, keep them at home until at least 24 hours after the start of antibiotic treatment to avoid spreading the infection to others.

Getting help and advice

As a parent, you may know if your child seems seriously unwell and should trust your own judgement.

You should contact your GP practice or call 111 if:

  • your child has had a cold and is getting worse
  • your child is feeding or eating much less than normal
  • your child has had a dry nappy for 12 hours or more or shows other signs of dehydration
  • your baby is under 3 months and has a temperature of 38C, or is older than 3 months and has a temperature of 39C or higher
  • your baby feels hotter than usual when you touch their back or chest, or feels sweaty
  • your child is very tired or irritable

Call 999 or go to A&E if:

  • your child is having difficulty breathing – you may notice grunting noises or their tummy sucking under their ribs
  • there are pauses when your child breathes
  • your child's skin, tongue or lips are blue
  • your child is floppy and will not wake up or stay awake

By teaching your child how to wash their hands properly with soap for 20 seconds, using a tissue to catch coughs and sneezes, and keeping away from others when feeling unwell, they will be able to reduce the risk of picking up, or spreading, many bugs. An e-bug resources for Early Years can help you to explain to your child what good hygiene habits are, how they can practice them and why they are important.